Tag Archives: Dutch lawfirm

Compliance and Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

With the GDPR the work of compliance and data officers will not become sexier. Companies in the EU area and their lawyers should work on the compliance with the new requirements the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). In force as per May 25, 2017. My lawfirm has prepared clients for the GDPR requirements.

Legal Advice on GDPR Data Protection

Personal Data in Europe under GDPR

Companies using personal data of European citizens should work on the compliance with the new GDPR requirements. Companies should have privacy notices and policies and analyse the legal basis on which personal data is used. Some of the issues the GDPR brings on:

  • companies outside the EU targeting consumers in the EU will be subject to the GDPR
  • data processors have direct obligations to comply with
  • data controllers and processors must appoint a Data Protection Officer (the DPO)
  • a written record of processing activities should be maintained carried out on behalf of each controller
  • consent to processing of someone’s personal data must be as easy to withdraw as to give and must be ‘explicit’ for sensitive data
  • data subject will have a right to object if personal data is processed for direct marketing
  • data controllers must notify most data breaches to the DPA; Fines of up to 4% of total turnover can be imposed.

Regulatory and compliance on data processing has gone to the next level with the GDPR. Compliance and data officers will have extra work to do.

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Filed under Dutch Law General Conditions, Dutch lawfirm, Regulatory Compliance Netherlands

Directors liability in the Netherlands

Directors of companies in the Netherlands can be held liable both in civil law and criminal law. Dutch law does not have the concept of disqualification.

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Civil liability pf Director Dutch Company

Each director has a duty towards the company to properly perform the duties assigned to him (section 2:9 Civil Code). That’s the general rule. There is only a failure if it can be established that the director has failed in the performance which could be reasonably expected under the specific circumstances. Failure of a director does not automatically lead to liability. Liability is only incurred in the case of serious culpability (ernstige verwijtbaarheid). Whether serious culpability is involved has to be determined on a case by case basis whereby all relevant circumstances have to be taken into account.

Joint Liability under Dutch Law

All directors are, in principle, jointly and severally liable for inlawful acts. An individual director may be discharged if he can prove that (i) he cannot be held responsible for the failure and (ii) he has not been – actively – negligent in preventing the consequences thereof.

Tort action againt board of Dutch Company

A director may be held liable in tort (onrechtmatige daad – section 6:162 Civil Code)) by a creditor on the grounds that he entered into a transaction on behalf of the legal entity, while at a time he knew or should have reasonably known that the company would not beable to meet the obligations, and would not have sufficient assets from which the debt could be recovered.

Exculpation of Dutch managing Director

It is not sufficient that there was a more than negligible risk that the legal entity would not be able to meet its obligations. The director should have anticipated that the risk would actually materialize. If the managing director has not taken an irresponsible risk when he entered into the transaction, the managing director cannot be held liable if in retrospect it appears that the company nevertheless does not fulfill its obligations and it was foreseeable from the start that the legal entity would not provide for recourse.

A managing director can also be held liable in tort if he has allowed or effectuated that the legal entity does not meet its obligations under an earlier commitment and consequently causes damage to the other party.

Director’s Liability in bankrupcy

Such claim in tort can also be brought by the receiver in bankruptcy, on behalf of the creditors of the company (even though the bankrupt company would not have had a claim against the director).

If the legal entity does not provide sufficient resources to pay all creditors in the case of bankruptcy of the legal entity, the directors shall be jointly and severally liable for the deficit in the bankruptcy if (a) it is apparent that the management has not discharged its duties properly and (b) it is likely that the bankruptcy was caused by the mismanagement of the board. This is referred to as manifestly improper performance of duties (kennelijk onbehoorlijke taakvervulling) (section 2:138/248 Civil Code).

Mismanagement in Dutch Company

Only manifestly improper performance of duties during the three years preceding the bankruptcy is taken into account. Manifestly improper performance of duties means that no reasonably acting entrepreneur would have acted – in equivalent circumstances and with the knowledge the director had (or should have had) at the time – similarly.

If improper performance of duties by the board is established, all managing directors are, in principle, jointly and severally liable. If mismanagement is established, the directors are jointly and severally liable for the entire deficit of the bankrupt estate (although the court can mitigate damages).

Faults in bookkeeping

If the management has failed to keep its books properly (section 2:10 Civil Code) or has failed to publish the annual accounts with the Chamber of Commerce (section 2:394 Civil Code), improper performance is (irrefutably) deemed to have occurred and improper performance is (refutably) presumed to have been an important cause of the bankruptcy. An individual director can exculpate himself if he can prove that other factors were an important cause of the bankruptcy. However, the burden of proof lies with the director.

Similar liability rules apply for supervising directors and factual directors.

Criminal liability of Netherlands Comapny

Under particular circumstances, (factual) directors can be prosecuted (section 51 Dutch Criminal Code). For example, section 1 of the Economic Offences Act lists a number of obligations under Corporate Law, the non-compliance of which constitutes a criminal offence.

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Filed under Dutch Case Law, Holding Company Netherlands, Liability Netherlands, Netherlands Director's Liability